Infant Loss, Inequality and why things should change

I went to a workshop  a couple of weeks ago about ‘Inequality and Infant Loss: Identifying the gaps in women’s networks’.

I learnt that the UK rate for infant mortality is 4.1 per thousand. But for Caribbean Women it is 9.7 per thousand, for Pakistani women it is 7.4 per thousand, for African women 7.4 per thousand and for teen mothers 5.4 per thousand births.

I also learnt that in Bradford and Airedale the only risk group that get caseloaded midwifery are the teen parents.  Their normal birth rate is 94%.

The highest risk groups in our city do not get caseloaded midwifery and we know this is affecting outcomes.  And outcomes are not just statistics but human beings lost and unnecessary grief and suffering.

One to One Midwifery came to Bradford and Airedale offering women caseloading care on the NHS with evidence of great outcomes elsewhere. They are being prevented from operating in our area because our local CCGs are both refusing to commission them or pay the invoices on non contracted activity.

At the same time local Trusts tell us that they cannot at this time deliver one to one midwifery care even to the most vulnerable and at risk groups in our city – except teen parents – who need it most.

These UK infant mortality rates reflect our experience in Bradford district over several years and I am saddened and disappointed that the people who have the power to make a difference – without paying extra  – are currently choosing not to do so.

Is there any one there who will answer?  Who will do something that will make a difference?

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